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Thermador Pro Harmony PRD364GDHU 36-Inch Dual-Fuel Range Review

Power and performance meet a professional look and feel.

Credit: Reviewed.com / Chris Snow
May 28, 2015
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

High performance, with just a few shortcomings.

We ran an extensive series of tests on the Thermador Pro Harmony PRD364GHU dual-fuel range, measuring everything from its roasting abilities to the heat variance of its burners. We also took into account the hands-on experience we got baking, boiling, simmering, and roasting. Results showed the PRD364GHU to be a seriously capable range with few shortcomings.

The rangetop in particular was extremely strong. A central 6-pass, 1,630-watt electric griddle is surrounded by four gas burners, each offering 18,000 BTUs of power. Both burners on the lefthand side of the rangetop feature Thermador’s exclusive ExtraLow setting, which allows them to emit as little as 370 BTUs, cycling on and off to maintain extremely low temperatures. Maximum temperatures were about as hot as we’d expect from a gas rangetop, and each burner was astoundingly quick to boil water.

With the help of the ExtraLow simmer system, the front left burner hit a balmy 103°F, reaching a much-hotter 378°F when cranked to high. The left rear burner dipped even lower when set to ExtraLow, bottoming out at 86°F. Still, it was able to reach the same high temperature as the front left burner.

On the right side of the range, the front burner got as low as 172°F even though it lacks an ExtraLow setting. We measured had a slightly disappointing high temp of 361°F so we’d nudge cooks towards searing on the other burners instead. The right rear burner would be the best burner for searing, hitting its maximum temp at a steamy 427°F. Its minimum temperature couldn’t drop below 178°F, but that will still serve you well for simmering.

Not a single burner took more than 5 minutes to boil 6 cups of water, which is a real triumph, as far as we’re concerned. The quickest boiler was the left front, which took just 4:17, while the slowest was the 4:45 left rear burner. Still, 28 seconds isn’t a large enough difference to factor into your burner selection while cooking.

When it came time to test the oven, we baked and roasted real food to see how well the oven could handle it. Cakes did especially well in the standard bake setting, emerging uniformly browned from cake to cake, even if there was variation in doneness across the surface of each individual cake. Convection Bake yielded good results as well, but we measured a little more variance. Cookies were less successful—not at all even when baked with standard settings, but good enough with convection.

When we roasted pork in the oven using the standard settings, it emerged moist, evenly browned, and was quick to cook through. Convection very slightly slowed cook time and bumped up the evenness of the roast a small amount, but differences were basically negligible. At the end of the day, it seems convection is best for items that spend less time in the oven (like cookies) but does more harm than good for items that spend longer in the cavity.

The broiler proved quicker than average, taking just 7:30 to preheat the area just below the heating element. The oven as a whole, however, was slow to preheat. We waited 14:11 for the oven to hit a preset 350°F with the standard Bake setting, and 12:18 when using convection.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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